A Quick Guide to Branding Your Workforce: Guest Post

This week I have received an interesting article, which I like to publish today as a guest post. 

Branding is hugely important to the success of any business, no matter how big or small, and that goes for branding your workforce too.

 

Get it right and you lay the foundations for years of success, but get it wrong and your business will really struggle to get off the ground.

 

With that in mind, here are some quick tips for branding your workforce.

Uniform or Uniform Look?

The first thing to decide is whether you want your workforce decked out in a full uniform, or just for them to have a ‘uniform look’.

 

An actual uniform gives the staff a feeling of togetherness and also bring everybody onto the same level, but on the other hand, some workforce’s feel uncomfortable being made to wear a uniform.

 

If this is the case, you might want to consider just going for a ‘uniform look’ and asking staff to all adhere to a dress code.

 

This can be as simple as asking everybody to wear the same color, or just making sure that they all wear a smart shirt and black trousers, for example.

 

This post from ACAS looks at why uniforms can be a good idea for your business and the benefits that they can bring.

Decide on What They’ll Need

You’ll next need to decide how much of the workwear you’re going to need and exactly what you’ll need for your workforce.

 

This, of course, depends on the type of work that your business does. Obviously, if you run a restaurant or retail company, the staff will need to look smart, so you’ll want something like a buttoned Oxford shirt. However, for more practical jobs, the workwear will need to be hardwearing and durable.

 

This should be common sense, but just take a moment to really think about the tasks that your staff are going to be carrying out and whether the clothing will restrict them in this in any way.

Don’t Overlook Colour & Design

The color and design of your workforce’s uniform is hugely important but gets overlooked a surprising amount.

 

Make sure that you spend a little bit extra to ensure that you get a decent design that you’re happy with before proceeding.

 

Sites such as Fiverr and PeoplePerHour are great for reaching out to a huge number of freelance designers around the world so that you can get lots of different styles and ideas before settling on one.

 

Once you do settle on a color and design, be sure to keep them consistent, including the color palette, the fonts used and the impression that they convey.

Print or Embroidery?

Once all of the decisions are made and it’s time to actually get the workwear created, the last thing to decide is whether you’ll have the design embroidered or printed.

 

We spoke to Preston-based Stitch Embroidery, who said: “Both techniques have their advantages and disadvantages, but generally speaking, embroidery is more hard-wearing, so is better off being used in industries where the garment will have a lot of wear and tear.

 

On the other hand, printing can work out cheaper and will be much more appropriate if your logo and branding are more complex and intricate

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